About your Search

20100112
20100112
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the prime minister of pakistan and are meeting with president karzai. it was an interesting juxtaposition as we looked to the military component what is happening on the government's side in both pakistan and afghanistan. when it comes to the governance issue in afghanistan, in our meeting with president karzai, he stressed very much the significance of the upcoming parliamentary elections. the need to ensure that under the afghan constitution, that process moves forward to clearly define or establish the legitimacy of the afghan government and their processes as they move ahead. we also had an opportunity to visit the police training centers there in kabul. very important to understand the progress that is being made at the afghan army is being trained. they truly are operating at a deficit in terms of the numbers and bringing more recruits in, but what they have seen in the past several months has been remarkable in terms of the numbers of recruits that have come in. we met with the minister of defense, who indicated that just in the past month, the number of recruits that they have rec
memories of the taliban. while embattled president hamid karzai is riding his post election wave of hope. polling in afghanistan is daunting and dangerous. abc news and our partners here sent 168 pollsters out across the country door to door taking the pulse of 1,500 people also asking them about ordinary life here. for instance, that covering for women, the burqa, should it be the husband's decision or hers? in this country, a split decision. women say they should decide. the majority of men say it's the husband's choice. this woman added perspective "my husband's not the problem, she says, it's the taliban i'm afraid of. >> general stanley mcchrystal is the top u.s. commander in afghanistan and the architect of the troop surge now under way. she asked him if the strategy is working. >> reporter: have you done it? have you turned the tide? >> i believe we're doing that now. we've changed the way we operate in afghanistan, we've changed some of our structures. we're on the way to convincing the afghan people that we are here to protect them. >> reporter: do americans have to brace themse
of afghanistan, hamid karzai about many things, including the arrival of those new american troops, part of the surge. and also this crucial year for afghanistan, america, and this war. do you feel this year is the last chance? >> i cannot describe it as the last chance. or the only chance, no. i can call it a great opportunity. we must grasp it this year. i can say this is an important opportunity with the new interests in afghanistan by the united states with more awareness within afghanistan on our shortfalls and shortcomings and the requirements for a better afghanistan. >> part of the opposition of the united states was americans are losing their lives. and we know afghan security forces and civilians are losing their lives, too. but americans are losing their live lives when corruption is undermining the objective. >> the objective is here, indeed. corruption is there in afghanistan. corruption is undermining our government, our society, and we must continue to work against it. i as the president of afghanistan am responsible and must take care of the afghan part of corruption. wit
, we have bad memories of the taliban. while embattled president hamid karzai is ridi his post election wave of hope. polling in afghanistan is daunting and dangerous. abc news and our partners here sent 168 pollsters out all across the country door-to-door taking the pulse of more than 1,500 people. asking them about ordinary life here. for instance, that covering for women, the burqa, should it be the husband's decision or hers? in this untry, a split decision. women say they should decide. the majority of men say it's the husband's choice. this woman added perspective. "my husband's not the problem," she says. "it's the taliban i'm afraid of." and sometimes small signs of progress. 60% of our polls say they have cell phones. every single one of you? but 85% of them say they have no refrigerator, and in this poor country, few have hope of such a thing. and one more sobering number. more than half of afghans say they have never been to school. >> you can see more of diane's reporting from afghanistan on a special edition of "world news." >>> there's unexpected fallout from senate major
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)